Thomas Jackson

Thomas Jackson
  • Robert E. Kirby Chair Professor of Electrical Engineering
216 Electrical Engineering West
(814) 863-8570

Bio

Thomas N. Jackson is the Robert E. Kirby Chair Professor of Electrical Engineering at Penn State University. Dr. Jackson joined the faculty in the Electrical Engineering department at Penn State University in 1992 after twelve years at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center. Dr. Jackson’s research focuses on exploratory electronic devices and microfabrication techniques. His current areas of interest include organic electronics, oxide semiconductors, thin film electronics, biomolecular motors, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and display technology. Dr. Jackson’s group at Penn State demonstrated the first high mobility (>0.5 cm2/V×s) organic thin film transistors (OTFTs), the first OTFT with mobility >1 cm2/V×s and the first use of a SAM-treated dielectric to improve OTFT performance, the first OTFTs with temperature independent mobility, OTFTs with chemically modified source and drain contacts, and the first low-temperature, high-mobility (>1 cm2/V×s) solution processed OTFTs. Dr. Jackson’s group has also demonstrated OTFT driven LCD and OLED displays, fast ZnO circuits, and a range of other thin film devices and circuits. Dr. Jackson has been married for 30 years, has two sons, and is active in his local church. He is the author or co-author of more than 250 publications and 32 U.S. patents and has a Web of Science h-index of 40. Dr. Jackson is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, and a member of the American Vacuum Society, the Electrochemical Society, the Materials Society, and the Society for Information Display.

Academic Training

B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Michigan
M.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Michigan
Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering, University of Michigan

Research

Exploratory electronic devices and microfabrication techniques. Thin film electronics, organic semiconductors, oxide semiconductors, biomolecular motors, biodevices, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and display technology.